Research on Resiliency Strategies

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The Estuary Program, in partnership with WRI, funds research projects to help communities better understand climate risks and adaptation strategies that maximize ecological benefits.

Coastal Green Infrastructure Research Plan for New York City

Coastal green infrastructure protecting the shoreline at Brooklyn Bridge Park (NYC Department of City Planning)

The Hudson River Estuary Program and the New York City Mayor's Office of Recovery and Resiliency and Department of City Planning have released a research plan on the use of nature-based features (or coastal green infrastructure) to protect the coastal areas of New York City from erosion and flooding. The plan was developed by ARCADIS and the Steven's Institute of Technology. To learn more, visit our page on Coastal Green Infrastructure. To download the full report: Coastal Green Infrastructure Research Plan for NYC (PDF 1.16 MB). You can also watch a recorded webinar on the project online.

 

 

Coxsackie Boat Launch after natural shoreline restoration (HRNERR)

 

 

Sustainable Shorelines

Natural and nature-based solutions can be applied to shorelines to reduce erosion and flooding. The Estuary Program, with the help of our partners, has released a Coastal Green Infrastructure Research Plan for New York City. The Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines project provides case studies to document the use and benefits of ecologically-enhanced shorelines. 

 

Evaluation of Alternatives for an Offshore Breakwater system for Great Kills Harbor

Marina in Great Kills Harbor (Biohabitats)

The DEC Hudson River Estuary Program and the New York City Mayor's Office of Recovery and Resiliency and Department of City Planning have released a study evaluating the use of offshore breakwaters to mitigate wave action and erosion at Great Kills Harbor, on the eastern shore of Staten Island. To learn more, visit our page on Coastal Green Infrastructure. You can also download the final summary report: Great Kills Harbor Breakwater Study Summary Report (PDF 3.29MB), and appendices: Appendix A Summary and Appendices, Appendix B Summary and Appendices, Appendix C and D included in the Final Report, and Appendix E Handout and Presentation.
 

 

The Community Risk and Resiliency Act

The Community Risk and Resiliency Act (CRRA) requires state agencies and applicants to consider future physical climate risks, including storm surge, sea-level rise, and flooding, and extreme weather events in certain permitting, funding, and regulatory actions.  The state officially adopted sea-level rise projections in February of 2017. The New York Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Department of State (DOS) and other agencies are developing guidance to help New York State (NYS) agencies, permit applicants and stakeholders consider the risk of sea-level rise, storm surge, erosion, and flooding in projects and actions. This guidance will also be useful to local governments.  The Hudson River Estuary Program is partnering with DOS to develop guidance on the use of natural resilience measures to mitigate risks associated with sea-level rise, storm surge, erosion, and flooding. The use of natural resilience measures to reduce these risks is imperative to protecting our state’s communities and environment. New York has made reducing these risks a priority for the state.

Return to first page: Climate Risks in the Hudson River Estuary